Plant and seed sales and swaps – Spring 2019

Special thanks to Brenda Troutman for research

Delaware County and the surrounding area has many active gardening groups, gardening societies, arboretums, public gardens and historical sites that hold special plant and seed sales and swaps. We’ve collected descriptions of some of those sales below so you can plan your plant shopping adventures.

Many of these sales support various non-profit and charitable activities – so you can buy plants and do good at the same time. What could be better?

The Winters Heritage House Museum third annual Heirloom Seed Swap. Saturday, March 23, 2019 from 10am to noon at 47 East High Street in Elizabethtown, PA. More information here.

The Penn State Brandywine Sustainability committee plant/seed swap. Friday March 29th from noon to 1:00. Penn State Brandywine, Student Union Building , 25 Yearsley Mill Road, Media, PA 19063. For more information contact
Mary Fran. Email: Maryfran.mcl at gmail dot com

Providence Garden Club Annual Plant Sale. Friday, May 3rd, from 8 am to 1 pm and Saturday, May 4th,  from 8 am to 12:00 pm on the campus of Williamson College of the Trades, 106 S. New Middletown Road, Media Pa. More information here.

Tyler Arboretum Plant Sale. Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5, general public, 9am – 3pm both days. More information here.

Garden Club of Springfield 9th Annual Herb, Plant and Bake Sale. May 4, 9:00 am on Saxer Avenue on the grounds of the Old Schoolhouse. More information here.

Schuylkill Center Greenhouse and Native Plant Nursery Spring Plant Sale. Saturday May 4th & 11th 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, Sunday May 5th 9:00 am to 2:00 pm:  8480 Hagys Mill Road, Philadelphia, PA. Click here for more details.

Central Pennsylvania Native Plant Festival and Sale.  May 4, 2019,  10AM – 3PM,  Boal Mansion, Boalsburg, PA.   Click here for details.

Manada Conservancy’s 19th Annual Spring Native Plant Sale.  May 4, 2019, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm at Herbert A Schaffner Memorial Park, Parkside Ave, Hummelstown, PA 17036. Click here for details.

Scott Arboretum Selections: Spring Sale  Sat., May 11, 2019 – Member only shopping, 10 am – 12 pm,  free and open to the public, 12 – 3 pm. More information here.

The Brandywine Conservancy annual Wildflower, Native Plant and Seed Sale. Saturday, May 12–Sunday, May 13, 2018  – 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. More information here.

King’s Gap Plant Sale and Spring Garden Days.  10 am – 4 pm -May 11, 12 – 4pm May 12,   500 Kings Gap Rd, Carlisle, PA. More information here.

Delaware County Master Gardeners Home Garden School and Plant Sale. Saturday, June 1 form 10:00 to 3:00 at Smedley Park, 20 Paper Mill Rd, Springfield, PA. More information here.

Did we miss your favorite local plant sale? Include the information in the comments below and we will add it to the list.

Garden Chores for March

A month of managing mud

Weather wise, March can be a very unpredictable month. Sometimes you can tackle some early spring chores and sometimes you just need to sit on your hands and wait until the weather cooperates.

The biggest problem is wet, soggy soil. When doing garden work, avoid standing, walking or driving over wet soils as much as possible. Wet soils compact much more easily. It is extremely important not to till soggy soils, especially with a rotary tiller. Its not worth risking the soil structure of your planting bed just to try to gain a couple of weeks gardening time.

That said, here are some chores you might be able to tackle.

In much of Delaware County, this month is the time to start seeds for warm season vegetables and flowers that need 8 weeks of growth inside – things like tomatoes and marigolds. You can also start cool season crops like lettuce and broccoli to give them a head start for planting out in mid-April.
Some cold season vegetables (like peas, potatoes, spinach, carrots, radish, onion sets and directly seeded lettuce) can be planted in the garden near the end of the month provided the soil is not too wet to work. The soil should crumble when handled.

You can begin cleaning up garden debris. Rake excess debris carefully off beds that hold earliest bloomers first – bulbs and spring ephemerals.

Trim the old foliage from ornamental grasses before they start new growth.

Trim old foliage from very early spring blooming perennials like Hellabore and Epimedium.

Finish pruning fruit trees and some woody ornamentals. Rejuvenate some overgrown shrubs and hedges by cutting them back. This article provides guidance on what to prune when.

Ornamental shrubs can be transplanted while dormant provided – you guessed it – the soil is not too wet.

Plant pansies and violas in the garden.

Direct sow poppy seeds in the flower beds. Make sure to mark them so you don’t disturb them cleaning up beds later.

Carefully push any perennials that have heaved out of the soil due to freeze-thaw cycles back in place to avoid root damage. Take note of any perennials that will need to be divided next month.

Clean out any bird houses or nesting boxes to be ready for a new season.

Enjoy all the fresh air and sunshine that you can!

The weeds in my beds blues

Those wicked, winter weeds…

Spring is coming – honest, and with the change in the weather the cold season weeds are ready to explode. I usually have a very nice selection of early season weeds.  I thought I’d just share a few…

I’m not sure everyone calls them by the same common name, so I added botanical names – even though I hate giving them any sort of respectability.

Hairy Bittercress – looks innocent until the seeds start exploding

Right now I have tons of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine Hirsute). This is a winter annual that gets little white flowers on pretty tall stems.  The flowers turn into these long seed pods.  When the seeds are ripe, the pods explode when disturbed – shooting the seeds all over.  Apparently, the seeds can fly up to 16 feet! The best way to manage them is to pull them before they make seeds, but in my garden they like to hide inside other plants.  I think I’ll have them forever.

Purple deadnettle

Another weed growing now is Purple Deadnettle (Lamium pupureum).  I get this all around the edges of my vegetable garden and flower beds. It has square stems – always a warning sign because square stems belong to the mint family, usually very hardy and fast growers.  It gets pretty blue flowers, but it’s dangerous to let it go too long.  I try to pull it out of my vegetable beds whenever I see it and I put it in my brush pile, not my compost so it does not re-root.

I think my most hateful weed (at least this time of the year) is Creeping Charlie (Glechoma Hedoracea), also known as ground ivy.  This weed is a bit of a thug.

Creeping Charlie overgrowing a perennial geranium

It continues to grow in cold weather while many other things are dormant – twining its way around, over and under all the other plants, smothering them.  It grows over and under barriers, through small cracks in raised beds, and roots all along its stem. 

Usually I can work this weed out from around other plants, but sometimes I have to dig up the desired plant, untangle the creeping charlie and then replant.

Some say a weed is just a plant out of place, and its true that some plants we call weeds are actually very valuable to native insects and pollinators (like common violets for instance).

My approach is to try to maintain a kind of peace between my desired plants and the weeds. I think its OK to have a few weeds here and there.