Master Gardener Annual Garden Contest 2019

Are you proud of your garden and believe it is worthy of notice?  Enter the Delaware County Master Gardener 2019 annual Garden Contest being held this summer.

For more than 20 years, the Delaware County Master Gardeners have been sponsoring a garden contest for Delco residents as a way to way to educate and empower gardeners to beautify their environment . 

The contest is open to individual gardeners as well as community gardens in both ornamental and vegetable categories.  We welcome all gardens that merit attention. 

Sub-categories for the contest include:

Ornamental Gardens:

  • Native/wildlife – use of native plants that attract and sustain wildlife
  • Pollinator Gardens – use of plants that attract bees, birds, and butterflies
  • Landscape Design

Vegetable Gardens:

  • Individual
  • Community Gardens
  • Youth Gardens
  • Novice Vegetable Gardens for first year gardeners

Garden judging takes place on June 14th for the ornamental garden categories and August 9th for the vegetable garden categories .

You can download a copy of the contest registration form here.

Winners will be notified by mail. First, second and third place winners in each category are invited to our Fall Fest in September 28th in Smedley Park to receive their ribbons.  

Weed Watch – Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine may have cheerful yellow flowers, but don’t let it fool you. This is an aggressive, non-native thug that is wreaking havoc in our natural landscapes (not to mention front yards, back yards, flowerbeds and lawns).

Lesser Celandine (known as Ficaria verna but sometimes still listed as Ranunculus ficaria ) was brought from Europe in the 1860’s as an ornamental plant and escaped cultivation. The plant has shiny, dark green, kidney shaped leaves and bright yellow flowers. It typically emerges in late January to early February.

Because it emerges so early and creates a very dense mat of leaves, it smothers many of our native spring wild flowers by blocking out light, air and growing space before they can even get started. Our native insects are then deprived of the pollen and nectar they need early in the season.

Lesser Celandine is an ephemeral and is usually dormant by late June. This can cause problems in wetlands because other plants have been snuffed out so there is not as much vegetation left to prevent soil erosion in late season flood events.

Lesser Celandine is a very vigorous spreader, mainly through underground tubers and bulblets attached to the leaf stems. It prefers moist soil, but can survive in drier areas. It can colonize an area very quickly.

The tubers and bulblets can be spread by animals, by flooding and even by well meaning gardeners. It is often seen along stream banks where it has been spread by water flow.

Managing Lesser Celandine is very difficult. Small infestations can be weeded out, but you must remove all the tubers and bulblets. Weeding can actually spread the weed if you are not careful. To help contain the spread, keep in mind:

  • Never put removed Lesser Celandine in the compost.
  • Do not pile it on the ground or rake it up, put it directly in a disposal container. You may need to dispose of some soil along with the tubers to ensure you have removed it all.
  • Mowing Lesser Celandine can fling the small bulblets into other sections of the lawn.
  • When the plant is dormant, its easy to move the tubers from one part of the garden to another when transplanting other plants.

It is possible to eliminate Lesser Celandine with herbicides, but the window of opportunity is small. Here are a few references that discuss the use of herbicides.

Master Gardener Pollinator Display Garden

Learn about pollinators at the display garden in Smedley Park.

Article by Louise Sheehan and Heather Gray

One community educational endeavor in which Delaware County Master Gardeners are engaged is the creation and maintenance of various display gardens.

One such garden is the Pollinator Garden. Located on the Penn State extension grounds at Smedley Park, it was founded in 2002 and is replete with mostly native plants that sustain butterfly, bee, and bird pollinators. The purpose of the garden is to inform the public about native plants that attract pollinators.

These pollinators are essential in moving pollen from one plant to another in an effort to produce more plants.  Selecting native plants sustains the natural wildlife and beauty that is unique to our region.

Some plants in the garden are penstemon, bronze fennel, monarda, echinacea,and lobelia cardinalis. This variety of native plants has attracted a delightful diversity of butterflies, including monarchs, pearl crescents, silver spotted skippers, black swallowtails, to name a few.

Insects and animals are essential for pollination. The seeds produced through pollination are the basis of our ecosystems. These plants stabilize the soil and purify the air. Pollinators are also responsible for much of our nutrition; without them, we would not have an ample supply of fruits and vegetables.

Tending the garden begins in early spring with a general clean-up and deciding what additional plants should be purchased or replaced.  Each week throughout the summer, the Pollinator Garden Committee members, maintain the garden by weeding, watering, replanting, pruning, etc.

In 2013 the garden received the Community Greening award from the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society. It also earned a Penn State Pollinator Friendly Garden Certificate.

The public is invited to visit the garden to view the flowers and pollinators and to learn which plants to choose for their own gardens or to just sit and enjoy the beauty and richness of the garden. To aid gardeners in selecting plants, a brochure entitled How to Grow Your Own Pollinator Garden was designed and created by some of the committee members and is available at the garden. It provides the public with key information on the plants in the garden.