Plant Profile: Baptisia

A perennial with presence

Baptisia australis flowers

Baptisia is a tough, deer and rabbit resistant group of herbaceous perennial plants that provide beautiful spires of flowers in spring and handsome, disease and pest resistant foliage the rest of the season.

Baptisia is commonly known as false indigo or wild indigo because a blue dye can be made from some species. Dye made from Baptisia was exported from the colonies to England in the 1700’s.

Baptisia australis

Baptisia australis, a blue flowering species, is native to Pennsylvania. Other Baptisia species have flowers in white (Baptisia alba) and yellow (Baptisia sphaerocarpa). These different species have been crossed to create many beautiful and robust garden perennials.

Baptisia flower best in full sun and pretty much any average garden soil – they are not pH sensitive. Because of their extensive tap root they shrug off drought, but this also makes them difficult to move once established. They create sizable, shrub-like plants when they mature so be sure to take note of the chosen cultivar’s size and leave room for growth. The seed pods can be attractive in winter, but if desired plants can be trimmed after flowering to control size and prevent any flopping on to neighbors. Baptisia will push out new leaves after trimming to cover any rough cut stems.

Baptisia ‘Decadence® Lemon Meringue’

It’s generally better to plant Baptisia in the fall in our warmer climate, but it can be planted anytime. Just be sure to give it some water its first summer if you plant in spring.

Because Baptisia grow to shrub size every year, they appreciate a top dressing of compost or a dose of slow release fertilizer. Be careful working around the plants in spring because breaking off the new growth will eliminate flower buds.

Baptisia can be slow to get started in the garden because it’s busy underground building its root system, but be patient and you will be rewarded with a beautiful, dependable, long-lived plant. Bet on Baptisia – you won’t be sorry.

Want more information? Here are some links:

Mt. Cuba Botanical Garden Baptisia Trials report

Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder – Baptisia australis

Clemson Cooperative Extension – Baptisia

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