Growing Greener

by A. Goldman

Bounty from the garden

Improving our landscapes can create environmental benefits. Gardens can create habitats for wildlife, help clean the air, sequester carbon from the atmosphere, help manage storm water runoff, and even reduce our carbon footprint by growing food in our own backyard.  

Here are a few suggestions for making your garden even greener.

Follow the principals of integrated pest management (IPM). Use the least invasive and toxic method possible to control pests and diseases.

Compost bin in vegetable garden

Yard waste comprises up to 20% of a landfill. Most of these materials are biodegradable and can contribute to soil health.   There is a technique to composting kitchen and yard waste if you want results quickly, but it does not need to be complicated. A simple heap of materials will eventually break down, no turning or management needed if you are patient.  No room for a compost pile? Consider “in place” or “trench” composting right in the soil.

You can also use yard waste to mulch in place. When trimming back your garden this fall use the chop and drop method. Chop up large leaves and stems and let fallen leaves remain around the plants.  Using green materials in place can prevent erosion, increase your soil’s viability and smother weeds. However, do not chop and drop if the plants are diseased – diseased materials should be removed.

Create a Habitat Pile for birds, toads, and small critters with excess of twigs and branches.  If you don’t have the room for that, just breaking up smaller twigs and adding to the garden makes a difference. These will break down quickly and the smaller they are, the less you will see them.  Larger pieces can be used for plant stakes, defining path edges, helping to hold soil back on a hill or even pot feet under your planters. 

Gardeners usually generate a significant number of empty nursery pots every season.  The best solution is reuse, especially since nursery pots are not usually recycled even if they are included in your recycling bin. If you know of a fellow gardener who shares or propagates plants from their garden, ask them if they could use quart or gallon pots. Pots can also be used in large planters at the bottom to make it lighter and reduce the amount of potting soil needed.   They are great for pot-in-pot planting. You bury a black plastic pot to ground level and then it can accept another already potted plant.  This allows you to change out what is planted in that particular spot at any time.  Planting spring bulbs this way allows you to protect bulbs from voles and if you put some hardware cloth over the top, from squirrels. Once the bulbs are done blooming, you can then opt for something else in that same spot. 

If possible, buy mulch and soils in bulk to avoid all the plastic bags. Consider re-using the bags you do get as trash bags in your shed or garage in place of a new trash bag.  Cleaned bags can be kept in your car when plant shopping.  Place your large plants or groups of smaller in a rolled down bag to keep them upright and contain any soil from the bottom of the pot.  

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