Plant Profile: Amsonia hubrichtii

Amsonia hubrichtii has the common name Bluestar or Threadleaf Bluestar. It is a hardy, long-lived perennial native to Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri.

This Amsonia has lovely, feathery foliage that adds a unique, billowy texture to the garden. It blooms in spring with light blue, star-like flowers – but this plant really shines in the fall with brilliant golden-yellow foliage.

Amsonia hubrichtii is easy to grow in average, well-drained soil . With time it can grow quite large, 3-4 feet tall and wide with a shrub-like appearance.  This perennial starts slow and may need a couple years to fill out but once established it is hardy, dependable and rarely needs division. A polite grower, it does not spread by rhizomes and is not known to aggressively self-seed. Amsonia hubrichtii is deer and rabbit resistant and has no serious pests or diseases.

The flowering and fall color is best in full sun, but it will tolerate some shade.  If grown in too much shade or very rich soil, its habit will be open and floppy. Cutting it back about 6 inches after blooming will help prevent flopping.  

Want more information? Here are some links:

Missouri Botanical Garden  Plant Finder

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Plant Profile: Rudbeckia laciniata

A tall, native coneflower

Rudbeckia laciniata is commonly known as cut leaf coneflower or green headed coneflower.  It is a stately native perennial that can reach 9 feet tall under the right conditions but generally grows 5-7 feet tall. Its preferred location is full to part sun in moist soil. It naturally occurs in moist woodland clearings or along stream beds. It is adaptable to average garden soil, but may wilt during periods of drought without supplemental water.

Like many plants, there are both pros and cons to adding Rudbeckia laciniata to your garden.

On the positive side, this rudbeckia provides plenty of sunny flowers and has a long 2 month bloom time – July through September.  The size and bright coloration of this plant creates a strong accent in the garden at a time when some other perennials are starting to wane.

The flowers are attractive to bees (both native and domesticated) and butterflies, providing a late season nectar source.  They have attractive seed heads and the flower seeds provide food for finches in the fall.  This coneflower is generally pest and disease resistant and can handle hot, humid summer weather.  It is considered deer and rabbit resistant.

Because of its tolerance for moist soil and periodic flooding, it is a good plant for flood prone areas or rain gardens. Given space, it can create a (very tall!) groundcover. The root structure provides good erosion control.

However (here come the cons), in moist sunny areas this coneflower can spread somewhat aggressively by underground rhizomes. Plants should be edged or divided in spring to control the spread.

In fertile soils, more shade or windy areas the plants will probably need staking to keep it upright. 

While the plants will probably survive drought, the lower leaves will droop and brown. Drought stress can occasionally result in powdery mildew.

If you can give this plant a bit of moisture and some room to grow, it might be a great addition to a pollinator friendly landscape.

Want more information? Here are some links:

Missouri Botanical Garden plant profile – Rudbeckia laciniata

Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center –  Rudbeckia lancinata

Plant Profile: Echinacea purpurea

a native pollinator favorite

Echinacea pupurea

Echinacea purpurea has the common name Purple cone flower.  It is a lovely herbaceous perennial that is native to eastern North America. Its showy blossoms usually appear in late June to early July and can rebloom through August. The blooms are very attractive to bees and butterflies making Echinacea a great addition to a pollinator friendly garden.  Gold finches will also visit the flower heads as they ripen to eat the seeds.

Echinacea grows best in full sun, but will take some shade. It requires well drained soil and is tolerant of drought and poor soil. It grows 2 to 5 feet tall depending on the cultivar and for the most part is self-supporting, but may need some support if grown in rich soil or too much shade.

Echinacea generally will continue to bloom whether spent blossoms are removed or not, but removing spent blossoms early in the season may make the plant look more tidy. Consider leaving some spent blossom seed heads over the winter as a food source for birds, but be prepared for some self-seeding around the base of the plant.  I consider this a bonus, and simply move the volunteer seedlings where I want them in the spring. Echinacea is also used as an herbal supplement to boost the immune system.

Echinacea flower

While called purple coneflower, the common version is more of a pinkish-purple and it has been hybridized into a variety of different colors including white, yellow, orange, red and even bi-colors. Some varieties are quite fragrant.

There are also coneflowers that have been hybridized with double or triple the petals to create a “pom-pom” effect, but note that these doubles and triples are not useful to pollinators because the hybridization process eliminates nectar sources.  These hybrids are also mainly sterile, so they do not provide seeds for birds.

Echinacea can be susceptible Aster Yellows. This is a disease caused by infection by a microorganism called a phytoplasma. The infected plant’s flowers will remain green and the cones will be distorted with leaf like projections.   The disease can be spread from an infected plant to a healthy one by leafhopper insects as they feed on different plants so it is important to remove any infected plants you find. There is no cure for Aster Yellows.

Echinacea are sometimes bothered by Japanese beetle which chew the flower petals but they usually out-grow “beetle season” and continue flowering.   

Want a little more information on Echinacea? Here are some links:

Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center profile

Penn State Extension – Echinacea Diseases

Iowa State Extension: Yellows Disease of Purple Coneflower

National Institute of Health of Echinacea Herbal Properties