Planning Your 2020 Garden

By A. Goldman

Anticipation is a gardener’s motto and thinking about the possibilities for next year’s garden is what eases the long winter months.  We may not be able to physically be out in the garden, but mentally we are! 

Winter allows a more leisurely approach to assessing and considering changes and can help avoid planting something in haste during the season just to get it in the ground. 

If you took pictures of your garden throughout the season, now is the time to revisit them to consider additions, changes, removal or repeating of certain plants.  Get a notebook out and make some notes before the thought or idea evaporates.

If you have a section of your garden you are not happy with but don’t quite know why, try converting the photograph to black and white. Sometimes the problem is too many plants of similar size, shape or texture. It’s much easier to identify this without the distraction of color.

When the weather allows, stroll around your property admiring nature that is visible now that you may not have normally noticed. 

If you do not see any birds or other wildlife then plan to add a feeder, a bird bath and more evergreens for winter protection. 

If winter winds bring down branches consider creating a brush pile in a remote location for critter habitat instead of disposing of them. 

Winter is also a great time to assess where to prune rubbing or crossing branches and dead wood as they are more noticeable without foliage. These branches can be added to your new brush pile critter habitat too.

If you have outdoor planters that contain woody plants, consider where those plants could make an impact in your landscape come spring.  Also plan for any plants that didn’t quite make it into the garden from end of season sales. You can also make note of plants that need dividing and where those divisions can be placed. Come spring, you’ll be ready for action.

In the winter and early spring when you are reading gardening magazines and garden blogs about all the new plant introductions, make some notes of things that would work in your landscape.  You’ll appreciate those notes when spring 2020 plant shopping starts and you encounter all the new introductions.  Your notes will allow you to make better choices, clear the “should I buy this” brain fog – and hopefully save you money too!

Spotted lanternfly on tree
Photo courtesy of Penn State Extension

A very important subject to think about for 2020 is how to deal with the onslaught of spotted lantern fly on your property.  This is a very serious threat to many tree species and the trees will need help to cope and survive.

Here are some resources for spotted lanternfly to help you plan your strategy.